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Webinar Rewind – Social Media & P2 (December 2016)

December 15, 2016 Leave a comment
susannahaaslyons

Susanna Haas Lyons

With more and more people demanding to be a part of the process when decisions affect them, social media has become an increasing reality for public engagement professionals. For the December learning webinar, civic engagement specialist Susanna Haas Lyons delivered a clinic on both the digital tools available and the approach needed in using those tools.

Digital engagement is a complement to traditional engagement methods – like face-to-face meetings – but Susanna points out that it can never replace those methods. Just as some people feel “left out” by online engagement, others are left out if it’s a question of physically getting to a location to take part in a process. Digital allows for the net to be cast wider and deeper, and to provide complementary opportunities for giving input.

Susanna breaks the approach for effective digital engagement down to five steps:

  1. Determine your objectives
  2. Identify specific participants and build relationships with those communities (ask yourself, “Who am I talking to?”)
  3. Determine the amount of time, resources and effort you’re prepared to invest
  4. Select appropriate channels for your engagement and community of practice (research which channels are more likely to attract certain groups)
  5. Track your progress throughout the project and adjust your approach along the way, as necessary (don’t wait until the late innings to decide that you might need a different approach)

One of the important take-aways is learning to recognize the “Engagement Pyramid”.

engagementpyramid

Engagement often focuses on the top and bottom-end of this range – either the highly motivated and involved people who own or lead a project, or those who are just learning or have a passing interest. But Susanna notes that there is a large sector in the middle who are interested, make meaningful comments, but tend to have other things on their plate. Reaching those people is just as important, in order to achieve the broadest and deepest process.

Categories: Webinars Tags: ,

REWIND-1 – Social Media and P2 – The IAP2 December Webinar

December 14, 2015 Leave a comment

Most of us in this profession now use social media to some extent, but are we using it to its greatest effect? In the IAP2 December Webinar, independent consultant Karen Zyphcyn (IAP2 Canada Wild Rose) and Robyn Austin (IAP2 USA Intermountain & Cascade), led the discussion that included a look at the various tools available, as well as the limitations of social media.

zypchyn-austin

Karen pointed out that nearly 60% of Canadian adults and 72% of adults in the USA are on Facebook. But what’s more important is the frequency of usage: Canadians average nine visits in a week and in the US, 70% of Facebook users visit at least once a day. That sort of information can give you an idea of how effective social media can be in reaching people. Only about a quarter of Canadian and American adults use Twitter.

IAP2 USA Priority Social Media Links

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn

But YouTube and good ol’ email are well worth considering: Nearly two-thirds of people in North America stream video now, so using video to convey your message and live-streaming your events (which is becoming easier all the time, thanks to apps such as Periscope) is another way of reaching people who can’t be there in person.

Robyn pointed out that a fear of transparency is one reason why many institutions – corporations, government agencies, etc. – are reluctant to invest in a social media strategy. There’s also a tendency to want to cram social media into an existing communications strategy, rather than include it in the overall plan.

Facebook is a good place to post information, and it’s worth the time to create a separate page or “community” for each project, so people don’t waste time (and get aggravated) searching through information on other projects to find what they’re looking for.

Twitter allows you to interact quickly with people in real time and to “live-Tweet” your events – assigning someone (a “designated Twit”, as one wag put it) to send Tweets about events, comments, and insights as they happen.

And good ol’ email – Subscribe today! – is still the most effective way of reaching people with the information you want them to have: Creating an email list is a must, no matter what tools you use.

The thing to remember, Robyn Austin says, is that social media is a conversation, and people who take part expect to be part of the discussion and if their comments are ignored, that can have a very negative effect on your entire P2 project. In other words, BE RESPONSIVE.

Click here to view the webinar recording and Power Point slide decks.

Categories: Webinars Tags: , ,

Schedule tight? Looking for a break? Recharge your P2 batteries and extend your stay!

December 9, 2015 Leave a comment

sunWhether you’re within driving distance or a short flight away, these one-day training options may be just the ticket for your busy schedule! The 2016 Skill Symposium offers one, two and three-day workshops designed to meet your professional development needs.

What’s more – if you can work it in – extend your stay! Bring the family to sunny San Diego for the weekend to take advantage of the special conference rate – $139.00/nightavailable through the weekend!

rejuvenate

Engaging with Influence
Increase your influence with key decision-makers!

Join IAP2 Licensed Foundations trainer Michelle Feenan from Queensland, Australia and New Zealand’s Anne Pattillo, an international leader in the art of engagement and participation, in this one-day exploration of how to build your professional credibility and increase the uptake of your professional advice.

You will have the opportunity to:

  • Build your understanding of the professional standards for ethical practice
  • Build your credibility for genuine engagement
  • Work with status practice new approaches to be influential by tailoring your approach to the decision-making style of the key people in your network
  • Practice the six critical engagement conversations build accountability and commitment

Add Engaging with Influence to your public participation toolbox to create sustainable results.

Engaging with Influence | 2016 Skills Symposium | #Top

Engagement Evaluation
Learn how to embed evaluation into your public participation and engagement projects or initiatives.

Join Anne Pattillo, workshop co-designer with participatory evaluation expert Dr. Jess Dart, and IAP2 Licensed Foundations trainer Michelle Feenan from Queensland, Australia in this one-day exploration of the principles and tools to design an evaluation of public participation and engagement projects or initiatives.

You will have the opportunity to:

  • Understand how to scope an engagement evaluation and design an evaluation framework
  • Understand the role of key evaluation questions and explore ethical considerations for data collection
  • Learn a set of practical steps to select appropriate methods for evaluation
  • Practice using a range of methods to describe and measure effectiveness
  • Identify common pitfalls in data analysis
  • Create a skeleton evaluation plan for a real project

Add Engagement Evaluation to your public participation toolbox to create sustainable results.

Engagement Evaluation | 2016 Skills Symposium | #Top

Digital Engagement in P2
Learn how to use information and communications technologies to support your public participation practice!

Join Tim Bonnemann, IAP2 USA board member and founder, president and CEO of Intellitics, Inc. in this lively presentation of how to effectively use technology to drive participatory processes and outcomes.

You will have the opportunity to:

  • Know when and why to use digital tools to widen, deepen or strengthen public participation
  • Identify the points in the design of a public participation process when decisions about the use of digital technologies should be made
  • Use worksheets and other design aids (to be handed out at the workshop or made available online) that inventory the factors to consider in assessing benefits to organizations of use of digital engagement in specific situations, and in choosing, adapting or designing digital tools and processes
  • Identify common pitfalls and challenges and develop mitigation strategies
  • Know where to find high quality information
  • Know how to make the case for digital engagement to peers and superiors

Add Digital Engagement to your public participation toolbox to create sustainable results.

Digital Engagement | 2016 Skills Symposium | #Top

More Tools!
Fill your toolbox with 4 new, innovative and effective community involvement techniques: Conversation Toolkit, Socratic Circle, Ideas Fair and Culturally Sensitive approaches to Community Involvement.

Join Dialogue Partners’ Stephani Roy McCallum, IAP2 Licensed trainer and lead developer of IAP2’s Emotion, Outrage and Public Participation course, and Erin Pote, teacher, facilitator, and community builder, in this one-day exploration of new tools you can add to your toolbox.

You will have the opportunity to:

  • Experience a participatory and interactive session that outlines 4 new tools for Community Involvement
  • Test the tools and express concerns, ideas and perspectives in a supported way
  • Identify how and when to use the tools in their processes
    Connect with a tool that will be useful in their work
  • Understand the tools and how they would be useful in different projects and with different stakeholders

Add Conversation Toolkit, Socratic Circle, Ideas Fair and Culturally Sensitive approaches to Community Involvement to your public participation toolbox to create sustainable results.

More Tools! | 2016 Skills Symposium | #Top

Rewind: “Getting Engaged – Staying Engaged” – the IAP2 October Webinar

November 13, 2015 Leave a comment

Should governments and other public institutions make an effort to “stay in touch” with citizens outside of a specific project that requires public engagement? That was the theme of our October Webinar, featuring a project developed by the School of Government (SOG) at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. The school has set up CELE – Community Engagement Learning Exchange – a blog, in which people from various sectors write on their views and observations and elicit responses from other “ordinary” members of the public.

The SOG has also been promoting “citizens’ academies” (sometimes called “County University”, “Neighbourhood College” or “City Hall High”) as a way to educate members of the public on the workings of local government.

The initiative is overseen by Drs John Stephens and Rick Morse of the SOG. CELE steers a middle course between the “cheese sandwich” blog – “I had a cheese sandwich for lunch today” – and the extreme-view political blog. The idea, says Stephens, is to draw people into a conversation and exchange views and knowledge.

Not that there isn’t controversy. Stephen Hopkins, a community activist in Raleigh-Durham, NC, and former chair of the local NAACP Housing Committee, says he deliberately sets out to provoke people: “I want to get people’s blood boiling enough to want to comment,” he says.

Along with Hopkins, contributors to the blog include Kevin Smith, a civic employee in Raleigh who conceived the idea and brought it to the SOG in the first place; and Brian Bowman, communications director for the town of Knightdale, NC.

So how are these efforts improving the level and quality of P2? CELE is still in its infancy, and one of the metrics is the number of comments on the blog posts. Morse says there are still not enough of those to declare it a success – or not. He and Stephens acknowledge these things take time, but they are certain they’re on the right track.

The Citizens’ Academies are already showing promise, but also have their limitations. Morse says they’re seeing an increase in the proportion of people getting involved in civic affairs and more likely to take part in public engagement efforts when an actual project comes along that needs to be addressed. (Remember that Citizens’ Academies are not driven by a specific project but by general interest in finding out how government works.) One of the limitations is that the Citizens’ Academies tend to be attended by middle-class retired people who have the leisure to take part. Another is that some of the more marginalized people are not able to participate in CELE: Stephens concedes that this is not the best way to reach them.

Check out the CELE blog, learn more about Citizens’ Academies, and review the October webinar.

Technology Corner by Adriana M. Hemzacek

November 4, 2015 Leave a comment
Adriana Hemzacek

Adriana Hemzacek

Social Media Content Tactics

I just left Simply Measured’s LIFT Social Conference in Seattle. I learned all about data and metrics – most of all – using the right metrics to make decisions regarding your content and reporting. I also learned some best practices in the social media business from keynote sessions, breakout session presenters, and coffee station conversations.

LIFTListAre you always looking for good social media content?

Do you love your followers?

Love how your clients/ customers are using social media?

Do they publish great original content?

If so, then repurpose it! Have someone else do the content creation for you.  Many say that customer-generated content elevates your brand’s reputation.

So, where do you start? How do you get your customers to do this work for you?

  • Your Best Work: Interview a client and write a blog post about it. Or ask them to write it themselves. Prepare a few questions in advance so the advantages of using your product or service will be highlighted. Do it live via Periscope and save the recording to post online.
  • Video Collaborations/Compilations: Work with a client to create a resource that would be useful to all followers? A video piece is the best type of content here. Remember to keep your videos to a 15-second or a 30-second spot. Keep all brand logos at the end of the video. Your audience will most likely catch the first 5-seconds of the video and your logo is not something that will entice them to continue watching.
  • Storybook Spotlight: There are a variety of ways to promote your customers, most notably by social media. Consider doing something more comprehensive like using an aggregator, such as Storify. This tool is free and reads like a book. Best part – it notifies each person involved in your “story” of the Storify. (Hopefully they will RT).
  • Lessons Learned: Write about a customer service experience and what you learned from it.
  • Live Tweet Sessions: Does your customer/client engage in industry-related webinars? If so, register for those webinars, listen to what they say, and (hopefully) the content goes back to your great work. If that is the case – tweet it! Showcase it in the form of a graphic or a quote. Always tell the client that you plan to do this – they will love it!
  • Photo and video galleries: This might be to show off examples of work or products – also great for photos of your happy customers. Consider Facebook albums and Instagram that easily integrate photos. If you want to showcase a video, post the video directly to the Facebook video gallery and not through YouTube or Vimeo. Your video will be seen for a longer period of time if the user does not have to click through to another platform to view. Remember to always ask for permission first, though.
  • LIFTwithTeaTestimonials: This needs to be a key piece of your content strategy. Start a process to regularly solicit testimonials from your customers/clients. Grab onto unsolicited testimonials, such as tweets about your service. Put the testimonials on your website – and everywhere else. Consider using a testimonial to preface your success story or case study. (Video testimonials are the best!)

Technology Corner by Adriana Hemzacek

August 25, 2015 Leave a comment

10 Ways to Get Social Media Content from a Conference

 

10-Ways-to-Turn-a-Conference-into-Social-Media-ContentFrom Twirp Communications

We all need to engage in professional development from time to time. Being with my social media peers always has a refreshing, invigorating and inspirational effect on me. If you’re going to take time away from your busy work schedule, and financial resources from other business building activities, you need to recoup what you’ve spent in other ways. There is a plethora of ways to turn a conference into great social media content. Here are just some of the ideas I came up with at my most recent professional development opportunity.

1. Write a Top 10 list of things you learned.

Here’s my Top 10 Takeaways from Social Media Marketing World.

2. Do a recap of each session you attended.

I’m still working on this one. I did write one recap of the Instagram expert’s Top Instagram Tips so far.

3. Create a Storify of the best tweets from the event hashtag.

I didn’t do one for #SMMW15, but many others did. Here’s one I like from Hootsuite. I tried to embed it here for you to see, but it takes up too much space. So go have a look, then come back…it’s ok…I’ll wait.

twirpcominstagram4. Create graphic versions of the best quotes from the event and publish on your networks.

I found a great app for my phone called InstaQuote that is super easy to use and makes great quotes, perfectly sized for Instagram. My favourite quote from Social Media Marketing World 2015 on Instagram is to the right.

5. Keep a list of blog ideas on paper during the conference and then write them.

My list from the conference included this blog you’re reading now, the recaps, Ideas for Periscope, and many others I may never get to. I’d rather have too many to choose from than struggle to think of something.

6. Do a complete conference recap with photos of the event, graphics, links to your favourites, and so on.

I didn’t do this at the time and I wish I had…now the memories of what some of the pictures represent are faded.

twirpcominstagram27. Record videos, if you’re allowed, and embed them on your blog and social media. Even better, can you Periscope something from the conference and embed that later. Periscope wasn’t on Android while I was at the conference, so Instagram video was the best I had.

I managed to record two Instagram videos. One from Guy Kawasaki by Twirp Communications, giving a shout out to my friend Adam Purcell, @CaringCounts, and another from CS Penn with a shout out to the Halifax PodCamp founders. For me, it was a great excuse to talk to these two social media celebrities without asking for something for myself.

8. Turn some of these blogs into SlideShares and post on LinkedIn.

This one is coming soon.

9. Write a post about all the new tools and resources you learned about.

I’ve been writing about Instagram and Periscope and some of the tools to work with those.

10. Create one master blog post that lists all of your posts to do with the conference.

AHEM. See what I did there?

Of course, you should also be taking pictures and sharing them on your social networks. Not only is it fun, but your clients like to see that you’re participating in professional development. It builds trust! What other ideas do you have for turning a professional development opportunity into social media content?

Originally posted on the Twirp Communications blog by Anita Hovey.

IAP2 Member spotlight: Thao Hill

March 10, 2015 Leave a comment
IAP2_ThaoHill

IAP2 Member Thao Hill

– By Lance Robertson

Member spotlight is a frequent feature of the IAP2 USA newsletter. If you have a suggestion for a future profile, please email Lance Robertson at lance.robertson@eweb.org.

Briefly introduce yourself. Who are you, and what do you do?

I am the Director of Strategic Accounts for GovDelivery. I started with GovDelivery way back in February of 2015 :-). My job at GovDelivery is to consult with its different teams (Sales, Marketing, Product, Implementation, Customer Service, etc.) to help drive more new partnerships with local and state government. So, essentially what that means is that I help government public information officers, communications directors, public participation professionals and others leverage the internet (the cloud, the web, whatever you wanna call it) to execute their successful communications strategies.

Many folks know me because of the work I did from 2005-2014 with another cloud services company – Granicus. Prior to that, from 2000-2005, I was the head technology officer for Public Systems Associates, the IT outfit for the Louisiana Legislature.

So, essentially, I’ve devoted my entire career to helping government agencies leverage technology in the most productive and useful way possible – particularly when it comes to getting information from inside government out into the hands of citizens.

I was born and raised outside of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, in a very, very small town. I received my Electrical Engineering degree from Tennessee Tech University.

How long have you been a member of IAP2? How did you first hear about the organization?

I officially joined last month! I’ve been involved with IAP2 since I attended the North American Conference two years ago in Salt Lake City as a technology vendor.

In your day-to-day public participation or community outreach work, what gives you the most satisfaction?

I get the most satisfaction when I see a press release from one of my customers informing the public about a service they are offering to help the public be better connected to their government. I can say “I was a part of that!”, and that’s super cool for me personally. Knowing I helped them make the decision to do something and it was successful!

What are the biggest challenges you’ve found in doing this kind of work?

I get really frustrated when I talk with someone in charge of public participation or communications and they say, “I’m happy with how we do things today.” They are not being open to doing it better. We should always be open to giving our citizens better services with their tax dollars.

Why did you decide to get more involved in IAP2?

I see how communications and public participation professionals love their jobs, and I have seen how helping government use technology better can make people feel more connected to their government. To use it to help get the public to take part in the decision-making process of government… that’s the most rewarding!

In several parts of the country, there is interest building in re-launching or re-building chapters to connect local folks on the ground. What’s your vision for the Northern California chapter? What kinds of things are going on there?

Too early to tell… but it feels like that we have the unique opportunity here to partner with a lot of tech businesses that want to help engage with the public, and our place will be to bring them together with public participation professionals and guide them so the tools we develop and use are ones that will actually work.

What are your off-work passions and interests? What do you like to do for fun?

I play the piano, and I sing… I do a lot of this for community service to organizations in San Francisco that are in need. I am a part of the San Francisco Ducal Court, which is a group of mostly entertainers that perform to raise money for many LGBT organizations in San Francisco.

Anything else you want to add?

I’m very excited to become more involved in my Northern California Chapter. My life passion has been to help governments utilize technology to achieve a more representative democracy built on trust between citizens and government. IAP2 can be a critical part of this very important goal, and I’m excited to be of service!