Member Spotlight: Chris Hartye

January 25, 2017 Leave a comment
Chris Hartye

Chris Hartye

Chris Hartye was formally introduced to IAP2 in 2008 shortly after joining the City of Hillsboro and being asked to update the Hillsboro 2020 Vision & Action Plan. Adopted in 2000, the 2020 plan was a 2002 IAP2 Core Values Award winner. The City of Hillsboro has most recently been recognized as the 2016 Organization of the Year Core Values Award winner for North America, due in large part to development of the Hillsboro 2035 Community Plan, which renewed the vision and action plan that guides the city. Hillsboro is a full service city with a population of 99,000.

With a background in strategic planning and stakeholder engagement from a business/economic development perspective, Chris recognized the IAP2 Core Values and Code of Ethics as largely “second nature” in the Pacific Northwest. It seemed a natural extension to conduct the City’s next generation planning efforts using the IAP2 P2 framework.

Chris gets the most satisfaction from hearing about what people are passionate about, “I love to hear firsthand what people care about, especially community members that don’t often voice their opinions, who aren’t always a part of decision-making processes. To directly hear their voice, passion, ideas, and dreams … to me, there’s really no substitute.”

Chris and his team made a point to go where people already are whether it be the farmer’s market, grocery store, or elsewhere. “When we meet people where they’re at, I find that they’re much more forthcoming as opposed to if you host a public forum, for example. People are often more candid, and more passionate, about the things that are important when they’re in their own environment. These are the conversations that carry with me as opposed to anything I’ve seen online or maybe heard at a public forum.”

hillsboro2035P2 = Empower Human Capacity

“Face to face allows for more robust conversation, and the opportunity to discover not only people’s passions, but their talents, resources and the skills they bring to the table. It’s often through P2 that we recruit our volunteers; you wouldn’t know or discover these talents if you weren’t out there doing P2. It helps you discover the human capacity in your city. And then to try to empower that as best you can – find opportunities to involve folks in what they’re good at; what they’re skilled at.”

#1 Challenge – Truly and authentically reach diverse audiences

The biggest barriers to authentic engagement are often language and cultural barriers. “It’s an ongoing, day-to-day thing; a box you never check.”

Hillsboro has communities of “new arrivals”, new residents that often haven’t formed formal organizations, so it’s challenging to reach out to them but the process can be fairly straightforward. From the first awareness a new group is emerging, a few of the first steps are:

  1. Awareness and identification – Understanding the demographics, the numbers, the geography of where folks are settling; what languages are spoken by the community;
  2. Finding community leaders – Whether they come through the faith community, are in the nonprofit realm, the business community, or affiliated through the schools;
  3. Engaging and listening to those leaders – But not by asking them to speak for everybody. “It’s not: we’ve talked with these leaders, so we’re covered; it’s about allowing them to inform you – local government – on the best way to go about engagement.”

“We try to be deliberate with community leaders in clarifying that we’re not here to ask them to be representative or make decisions on behalf of their communities; rather, we’re here to learn how to best engage with the community. And in the end, it’s that “little bit at a time” that moves us forward to creating new futures together by allowing P2 to help grow relationships and capacity.”

Chris has shared his story about the City of Hillsboro’s Community Visioning Process as a Core Values Award winner with IAP2 in the December 2016 webinar, as well as at the 2015 ICMA Annual Conference in Seattle with City Manager Michael Brown, and he looks forward to getting more involved in the IAP2 USA Cascade Chapter. To learn more, visit our 2016 Core Values Awards page.

2017 IAP2 North American Conference Committees – Volunteers Wanted

January 3, 2017 Leave a comment

We NEED you!

Have you ever wondered what goes into a Conference Program or how sessions are selected? Do you want to help select conference session speakers and poster exhibitors? If the answer is yes to these questions then consider volunteering for the Program Committee (click here to learn more about what is required).

While our world does not revolve around money it sure helps. The Sponsorship Committee plays a very important role in ensuring that IAP2 USA continues to receive funds – not only to support the Conference but events and activities all year long. Raising money is not for the faint of heart – are you up for the challenge? Click here for more information on the responsibilities of this Committee.

“I live in Denver or near by and I like to have FUN!”
If this is you then please consider volunteering for the Local Fun Committee. This committee helps to showcase Denver, make decisions on the opening reception, tours and so much more. We are expecting 350 people to attend the Denver Conference and this is your opportunity to show it off! Click here for more information.

I WANT TO VOLUNTEER – We are looking forward to you joining us. Please contact Jennifer at info@iap2usa.org with the subject line – Conference Volunteer by January 10th – we need your name, contact information and which committee you want to join. THANK-YOU!

Three Things That Are Working to Start the Greater Los Angeles Chapter

December 15, 2016 Leave a comment
rockstar

Chapter Volunteers Rock!

Kit Cole, Lauren Cobb, Jennifer Trotter, and Scott Woodhill have been spearheading the effort in Southern California to form the Greater Los Angeles Chapter of IAP2 USA. Since the first meeting in June 2014, the emerging chapter has been growing steadily and they now have more than 160 professionals on the invite list.

Three things have made important contributions to the Greater Los Angeles Chapter’s growth:

  1. Killer Speakers and Topics – EVERY SINGLE TIME! Because it’s tough to travel around Los Angeles, Greater LA team has found they need a great speaker with a great topic to motivate attendance. A great speaker puts their own twist on P2, and helps promote the event to their audience as well. For example, the Greater LA Chapter’s first meeting was held in a Southern California Edison (SCE) conference room with Genoveva Arellano of Arellano Associates presenting about her agency’s P2 work on a statewide transportation project. Her topic was amazing – how a Latina with a Harvard degree has cornered the market on P2 around transportation projects in Southern California. Another event featured Darrel Cole from Parsons Brinkerhoff presenting his team’s use of social media for better P2. Both speakers – and topics – were a big draw.
     
  2. A Super Organized Person in Chapter Leadership – A detail-oriented person who writes and sends invitations, manages RSVPs and maintains the email list of everyone and anyone who expresses interest in public engagement. Ideally, the email list comes to span not only public engagement practitioners but others like:
    • local government people
    • communications officers from engineering firms
    • management from utility, transportation, and other public/private partnership agencies
    • professors
    • non-profit civic engagement think tank representatives

     

  3. Get Personal – Use personal invitations and leverage your relationships! The event invite email comes from a personal email address – not an event invite service. Most importantly, for the first few meetings, members of the leadership team got on the phone and personally called people who they thought would be interested in attending.

Want to discuss your ideas for starting a chapter or work through your roadblocks? Email Kit (kit@kitcoleconsulting.com) or Lauren (ms.laurencobb@gmail.com) or contact info@iap2usa.org to be connected to the IAP2 USA Chapter Liaison Committee.

Webinar Rewind – Social Media & P2 (December 2016)

December 15, 2016 Leave a comment
susannahaaslyons

Susanna Haas Lyons

With more and more people demanding to be a part of the process when decisions affect them, social media has become an increasing reality for public engagement professionals. For the December learning webinar, civic engagement specialist Susanna Haas Lyons delivered a clinic on both the digital tools available and the approach needed in using those tools.

Digital engagement is a complement to traditional engagement methods – like face-to-face meetings – but Susanna points out that it can never replace those methods. Just as some people feel “left out” by online engagement, others are left out if it’s a question of physically getting to a location to take part in a process. Digital allows for the net to be cast wider and deeper, and to provide complementary opportunities for giving input.

Susanna breaks the approach for effective digital engagement down to five steps:

  1. Determine your objectives
  2. Identify specific participants and build relationships with those communities (ask yourself, “Who am I talking to?”)
  3. Determine the amount of time, resources and effort you’re prepared to invest
  4. Select appropriate channels for your engagement and community of practice (research which channels are more likely to attract certain groups)
  5. Track your progress throughout the project and adjust your approach along the way, as necessary (don’t wait until the late innings to decide that you might need a different approach)

One of the important take-aways is learning to recognize the “Engagement Pyramid”.

engagementpyramid

Engagement often focuses on the top and bottom-end of this range – either the highly motivated and involved people who own or lead a project, or those who are just learning or have a passing interest. But Susanna notes that there is a large sector in the middle who are interested, make meaningful comments, but tend to have other things on their plate. Reaching those people is just as important, in order to achieve the broadest and deepest process.

Categories: Webinars Tags: ,

President’s Message – Leah Jaramillo

December 15, 2016 Leave a comment

Leah Jaramillo

2016 was a year of great progress for all of us in IAP2. I am proud to share some of the highlights with you!

Your Community
Your membership in IAP2 has created a nation-wide community of P2 practitioners and managers across the USA. Now, there are members like you in nearly all 50 states and 200 cities in the USA. Because of you, IAP2 USA is well on its way to a creating a community 1,000 members strong. One of our most important roles is to be your home for good ideas, inspiration, skill building, and networking.

Programs and Services
As our membership grows, our focus is on offering programs and services to support you. New this year, we initiated web-based training to make skill building even more convenient and a Certification Program to reinforce the professional practice of public participation. We encourage you to check out these offerings and continue to hone your craft. We also launched a national student scholarship (for which applications are now open), a tiered Government Membership rate, and a government community of practice. More of these peer-based communities are being developed to link people in similar areas of P2. The second year of the Mentorship Program was a success and new applications will be accepted soon.

Popular Events
The year began and ended with strong national events: the skills symposium in February and the conference in September. The 2016 Skills Symposium was held in San Diego, and attracted people near and far who had one goal in common: to continually improve their skills. The year ended with the sold out 2016 North American Conference in Montreal with 240 attendees. Now, registration for next year’s San Diego symposium is open, offering 11 courses in February, and we are planning a great 2017 conference in Denver with more capacity to welcome our growing numbers.

Strategic Partnerships
We are building and strengthening alliances with similarly-minded organizations and developing ways to better reach P2 practitioners of all kinds. In 2016, we identified and prioritized a range of national, state and local partnerships, and added staff capacity to build and grow these partnerships in the new year.

A Strong Start for A New Year
These successes create a strong position to enter 2017, a year when the need for a strong community of P2 couldn’t be more relevant and needed. With this solid foundation and clear national need, we will welcome six new board members, launch a new communications campaign to increase brand recognition and value of our organization, and begin planning to update our strategic plan for 2018 – 2020.

Our objective is to strengthen P2 in every way: through recognition of IAP2 as a trusted and knowledgeable navigator of P2, through skill building of practitioners, and through building a national norm that values, trusts, and seeks out quality P2. While moving forward on these tracks, we’ll continue to offer the great webinars, programs and local networking opportunities we know you rely on.

With so many great new opportunities, we invite you to get involved through volunteering at the chapter or national level. Now is a great time to be a member and a volunteer so that we capitalize on the opportunities that are in front of us to make a difference to how our country and its communities advance in the coming years. We’re also looking for an intern to conduct research, create content for our website, blog & social media, implement member surveys, support marketing and strategic alliance efforts, and otherwise assist staff. If you or someone you know is interested, the deadline is January 11th for applying for the internship position.

We hope your holidays are exactly as you’d like them to be and we look forward to new successes together in the new year.

newyear

Categories: Board

Invitation to participate in NCDD’s field-wide inventory

December 1, 2016 Leave a comment

The National Coalition for Dialogue & Deliberation (NCDD) has invited IAP2 USA to participate in their field-wide inventory.

“Now more than ever, it’s vital for us to be able to say, with some authority, how large our field is, how many dialogues are held on an annual basis, involving how many people, and so on. We want to know what approaches you are trained in, which ones you tend to use, and which ones you train others in. We’d like to know which online tools you find most useful, and what factors influence your decisions about which collaborative projects you’ll get involved in. And true to NCDD style, we want to share this information widely.”

Please do take the time to complete this survey by the deadline — Wednesday, December 7th — if you haven’t already.
NCDD would greatly value your participation!

Webinar Rewind: NOVEMBER – Organizations of the Year and USA Research Project of the Year

November 30, 2016 Leave a comment

Did you know that engaging the public is a long-term commitment, rather than a short-term condition? Or that one in 4 Americans is affected by a doctor “missing the boat” with a diagnosis? Or that people in British Columbia who receive health services are regarded as “partners” rather than “patients”?

Those were themes in our IAP2 Learning Webinar on November 8, 2016, which featured the Core Values Award winners for Organization of the Year in Canada and the USA, and Research Project of the Year from the United States.

IAP2 USA Organization of the Year: City of Hillsboro, Oregon

The City of Hillsboro, Oregon, is no stranger to the Core Values Awards. The fast-growing community 30 km west of Portland won Project of the Year in 2002 for its long-term visioning exercise to develop “Hillsboro 2020”. In fact, its updated version, “Hillsboro 2035” was initially entered in the Project of the Year category, but the IAP2 USA judges moved it to Organization of the Year because of the way P2 has become ingrained in the city’s fabric.

Hillsboro has seen a 40% increase in its population since 2000 – up to 97,000 as of 2015 and on-track to reach 116,600 by 2035. The demographic is changing, with an increasing Latino population, along with immigrants settling there from India and Korea. The daytime population also shifts since 70% of the residents go elsewhere to work during the day, while 70% of the workforce at businesses and industries (the tech sector is a major employer there) comes from other towns.

hillsboro-1The City began developing “Hillsboro 2020” in 1997, recognizing the need to engage as much of the community as possible, and as more and more of the targets were achieved well ahead of plan, “Hillsboro 2035” was begun, working with Jason Robertson of J. Robertson and Co.

By then, the culture of P2 had become the way of life in Hillsboro. More than two dozen community organizations led the projects and a citizens’ Implementation Committee was overseeing the Action Plan. The Plan became a “living document”, being updated every five years, to prevent what city project manager Chris Hartye calls the “plan on a shelf” syndrome.

The engagement was accomplished through a combination of online and “traditional” tools. “There’s no substitute for face-to-face engagement,” says Hartye, as regular community events and presentations keep the connections and input flowing. He also points out that staff and supervisors get regular refreshers in P2, the city leaders have provided ongoing support and reasonable metrics help keep expectations in line.

Planning through “Hillsboro 2020” and “Hillsboro 2035” brought the city new open spaces, an expanded library, and even an off-leash dog park.

Planning through “Hillsboro 2020” and “Hillsboro 2035” brought the city new open spaces, an expanded library, and even an off-leash dog park.


IAP2 USA Research Project of the Year: “Clearing the Error”, Jefferson Center and the Maxwell School for Public Affairs at Syracuse University 

Kyle Bozentko (at the podium) and Andrew Rockway lead the Citizens Jury in “Clearing the Error”

Kyle Bozentko (at the podium) and Andrew Rockway lead the Citizens Jury in “Clearing the Error”

Engaging patients in the health care process was also a key in “Clearing the Error”, which won Research Project of the Year from both IAP2 USA and the entire IAP2 Federation. The Jefferson Center and the Maxwell School for Public Affairs at Syracuse University teamed up with the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine and the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality to look closely at the issue of diagnostic error.

It’s estimated that one in four Americans will, at some time in their lives, be affected by a problem with a medical diagnosis. It could be through mis-diagnosis (getting it wrong or incomplete the first time) or a missed diagnosis (not spotting the problem at all) or a mis-communication; any of which creates an avoidable delay in providing the right treatment. In fact, diagnostic error crops up in 10% of medical cases. What to do about it?

The research team used a variety of surveys and engagement tools and techniques, including Citizens’ Juries (check out the IAP2 webinar from 2015), to engage patients and healthcare consumers. Participants in the project identified roles patients might play to improve diagnostic quality and limit errors.

The research team found that deliberation had significant impacts on patient activation, health literacy, and other important measures. They also found that a majority of everyday citizens understood the recommendations and believed the recommendations were easy to use and would have a positive impact on diagnosis. The research team is currently working to assess the perceived quality of the recommendations created through deliberation as compared to recommendations made by non-deliberating bodies, including those made by a professional medical group. In the future, the team hopes to test the efficacy of the recommendations for improving the diagnostic process and diagnostic quality in clinical settings.

Organization of the YEAR: IAP2 Canada: British Columbia Ministry of Health

The British Columbia Ministry of Health was recognized for its “Patients as Partners Program”, which has been around less than 10-years (and counting) to give patients and their families a greater voice, choice and representation to improve healthcare at the individual, community and system level.

bc-health-photo

Patients as Partners annual dialogue featuring patients

Shannon Holms, the program director, explained how the “old” approach to health care, structured around the needs of hospitals and healthcare providers, with medical staff regarded as experts and patients as recipients of information and instruction was no longer unsustainable. Costs were rising, taxpayers’ dollars were limited, the population was getting older and patients were demanding more input into their care.

In 2007, the British Columbia provincial government endorsed a new approach, which involved a common language, common tools and a common approach to involving patients and health care providers to foster their collaboration to improve healthcare in British Columbia. Holms explained that the IAP2 Core Values provided a “north star” for the Ministry and Delaney and Associates provided training for some 800 health care workers resulting in 40,000 engagements with patients.

Some of the results tailored for individual regions in BC include:

  • The Vancouver Island Health Authority developed a program to prepare patients before surgery.
  • The Interior Health Region engaged patient and family partners in the Interior Health Eating Disorder Regional Planning Day to foster engagement and collaboration and to gather information to be considered in the development of the Interior Health Eating Disorder Strategy.
  • Northern Health engaged patient volunteers to streamline the process for transferring patients from hospitals to community care – condensing 24 forms down to one.
  • Providence Health in Vancouver included patient partners on the committee to hire a new respiratory therapist.
  • In Ridge Meadows, just east of Vancouver, patient volunteers were invited to work with general practitioners and radiologists to help improve communications and imaging results.

Among the lessons-learned, Holms says, is to maintain good relations with patient-partners and to keep leaders informed, involved and engaged.

rewind

Click here for additional resources from the webinar.

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