GEAR UP for Online Training!

April 18, 2017 Leave a comment

We are ready to rock this spring with online training designed with you in mind! We are excited to announce we have two courses coming up as early as May 1st, 2017! Take a look and see what these two courses can add to your professional repertoire!

“Choosing the Right P2 Tools: Workshops, Surveys, & Tools – Oh, my!” – If you need to know how to select tools and techniques to fit your P2 process design, understand the huge impacts of tool choices on stakeholder participation, and learn how to ensure equity and inclusion, Choosing the Right P2 Tools – Workshops, Surveys, & Tours – Oh, My!” is the course for you!

This 4-hour online course over two weeks is taught by recognized P2 consultant Anne Carroll and specifically designed to be interactive, insightful, and engaging. You’ll walk away with access to an open-source directory of tools and techniques, as well as skills to better weigh your options so you can confidently construct your next project and better engage your stakeholders!

Take a seat in this virtual classroom! Reserve your spot today!

“Participatory Budgeting: Real Money, Real Engagement” -We are three weeks away from offering the much anticpated co-produced course “Participatory Budgeting: Real Money, Real Engagement”, featuring Maria Hadden from the Participatory Budgeting Project!

Maria has years of facilitation and training experience, previously working as a mediator and a mediation trainer prior to taking on her role as Project Manager for the PB Project. As a project manager, Maria oversees activities in the Midwest and Southern region of the US, leading advocacy, training, and implementation of consulting efforts.

This introductory course is designed for anyone interested in planning and advocating for PB in their community! This course is recommended for elected officials, government staff, consultants, and organizations looking to gain a solid foundation in PB before decidend if and how to move a process forward locally.

Spaces are limited and we want YOU to be there with us! Find out more today!

Read more

 

Categories: Virtual Training Tags:

Webinar Rewind, April 2017: Core Values Award Winners – “Creativity and Innovation” and “P2 for the Greater Good”

April 18, 2017 Leave a comment

Van Ness Avenue is the “spine” of San Francisco – a part of Highway 101 – but it’s fallen into disrepair in recent decades. It runs past City Hall and cultural organizations like the ballet and the opera. It’s one of the densest transportation corridors in the city. As a piece of the city’s history, it was used as a fire-break in the Great Fire of 1906 – most of the east side of Van Ness burned up, and what was on the west side was more or less protected.

When it came time to upgrade the thoroughfare – sidewalk-to-sidewalk, from fifteen feet below the surface to 30 feet above — the city brought together various agencies – including the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) – to put the Van Ness Improvement Project together. Lulu Feliciano, SFMTA’s Outreach Manager, says that may be the more efficient way of doing things, but it also meant major inconvenience for the people living and working along that stretch.

SFMTA had already recognized the key principle of IAP2: that people affected by a decision have a right to a voice in that decision, and with such a wide range of interests to cover, the agency had to go beyond more traditional methods to reach them.

SFMTA took pre-construction surveys, using hard copies, online surveys and door-to-door visits, asking people about their conceptions of the noise, parking issues and other inconveniences regarding construction in their area. This direct consultation helped cultivate relationships with the neighbours.

These data – collected from 85 percent of businesses and residential properties – were shared with the contractors in developing a construction strategy and sequence that addressed residents’ concerns such as traffic circulation and parking. SFMTA also learned about specific business needs that had not been considered before, and a Business Advisory Committee was set up to deal with those specific needs. That committee has had direct access to project staff and has helped develop strategies to help businesses through the impactful construction of the project. Some of the tools developed with the committee include a Construction Survival Guide packed with information for businesses, as well as a campaign to discourage double parking on the corridor.

A series of walking tours helped show the public what the existing conditions were and what would be improved through the project.

A key challenge SFMTA faced was one many practitioners face: getting past “the usual suspects”. They found they had been hearing from the same people they heard in other projects, and they knew they needed to find other ways of reaching out. They learned, for example, from the City of Chicago’s experience, that setting up a text messaging system to create a two-way conversation was vital. This tool was especially helpful in engaging younger audiences. Among other things, these updates involved keeping people informed on when they could give input on specific aspects of the project.

The text surveys were not just in English, but also in Spanish, Chinese and Filipino. So far almost a thousand have responded; SFMTA is reaching the goal of including new voices as 60 percent indicated they were unfamiliar with the Van Ness Improvement Project and 79 percent opted into the text messaging conversation.

SFMTA made extensive use of texting through the GovDelivery platform. They also learned a lot about the limitations of the system – such as, the fact that it did not allow for people who indicated they did not know about the Van Ness Improvement Project to automatically receive updates on the project. SFMTA Public Relations Assistant Sean Cronin says that makes it important to continue pushing information out to people who responded and cultivate relationships that way.

Here are some of the resources SFMTA used:

Textizen Knowledge Base

Three tips for writing a great survey hook

Gallery of outreach materials

Five tips for Creating an Effective Outreach Poster

Construction of the Van Ness Improvement Project began late last year and is expected to continue through 2019. As construction progresses, the team will expand on its pre-construction efforts to foster relationships with the public and continue to be good stewards of the neighborhood.

Watch the webinar here.


It’s a conversation that is difficult at the best of times: what one’s health-care wishes are, around the end of life. How do you know what someone’s wishes are, if they can’t speak for themselves any longer?

CEAN – the Community Engagement Advisory Network at the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority – tackled the problem with a unique, peer-led approach, bringing the patients themselves into the conversation. For that, CEAN won the 2016 IAP2 Canada Core Values Award for P2 for the Greater Good.

CEAN is a group of community volunteers that advises VCH on planning and delivering health-care services, coming from the perspective of the patient or family member. The idea of Advance Care Planning started over a decade ago, and in 2010, members of the VCH Senior Leadership Team, Board and CEAN held a public forum on ACP. Two major themes emerged: the importance of the public talking to the public, and the importance of conversation.

According to Pat Porterfield of CEAN, the number of legal forms that have to be filled out can cause one to get bogged down in that aspect and miss the importance of talking to one’s family and friends about those wishes. It was equally important to have people talking to people, because some of the members of the forum noted that there could be skepticism of the role or motives of the Health Authority leading the discussion.

Some were concerned that the Authority could be seen as having an ulterior motive – like controlling health-care costs. Forum participants also noted that it would be important for members of the public to hear “testimonies”, as it were, from others who had had those conversations with their families and friends. It was necessary, then, for VCH to be seen to be supporting the initiative, but that it be driven by members of the public: it’s the conversation that’s important.

The main requirement for volunteers taking part in this project is passion for helping people have this conversation and often, the facilitators have personal experiences: they may have had an advance-care conversation in their own lives, or there hadn’t been such a conversation and they wished that there had.

Each facilitator develops their own workshop, but the team works together very collaboratively; supporting one another emotionally, and when developing and reviewing materials for the public.

Each workshop ends with an evaluation, and feedback has been very positive: whether workshop attendees are looking for help in making their own plans or to have the conversation with a loved one, they feel they understand the process better and are more capable of making decisions as a result.

Reposted from IAP2 Canada.

Categories: Webinars

Member Spotlight: Larry Schooler

April 18, 2017 Leave a comment

Larry Schooler

By Lauren Wirtis, IAP2 USA Intern

Larry Schooler is Manager of the Public Engagement Division for the City of Austin, which, Larry jokes, sounds impressive until you realize the division is comprised of two employees. What is truly impressive is all that Larry and his division have accomplished since he started working there in 2009. For one, that was the year Larry became involved with IAP2 USA. After attending his first workshop, Larry thought: “I found it. I found what I’ve been looking for professionally as a field and a secular calling.” During the workshop there was an exercise where participants created headlines they wanted to see for IAP2; Larry still has that posted in his office. Over the years Larry has participated in many of the programs IAP2 USA has to offer.

Larry enjoys that “IAP2 feels so collegial and focused on the sharing of resources. I always walk away from conferences feeling like I learned so much and gave so much in return.” Larry decided to get more involved and was elected to the IAP2 USA board in 2011. In 2013, he was elected president of the board. At the time, Larry noticed that he was one of the few younger, public sector members of IAP2. He was excited to step up as president, craft a vision, and find people to help him carry out that vision.

Still an active member in IAP2, Larry considers himself to be “a community-wide interviewer” who ensures that decision-makers have information from a broad cross-section of the public when they are creating policy. At the Public Engagement Division, Larry and his team help other divisions implement good P2 by helping design the process, facilitate events, deploy a variety of digital tools, and analyze and summarize data. Larry gets the most satisfaction from his work when he hears from a citizen or member of the public that they feel like the process was a good one. “Sometimes I hear this from people who didn’t like the final outcome but think the process was fair.”

These moments make Larry feel like he’s achieving his mission to make the whole process fairer to a greater number of constituents. As a mediator, he works to develop relationships between diverse groups in order to get to a place of understanding and agreement at the end of the process, and has helped a number of task forces with diverse perspectives come to consensus.

“I think too often in the U.S. we’re so results and efficiency driven that we focus on getting to an agreement before we address the relationship.”

Larry has worked to build relationships between the City of Austin and the community using a wide range of tools. One is the Conversations Corps, a unique program in which volunteer liaisons go out into the community to hold meetings with the different districts. This helps the City reach a wider spectrum of constituents and create more representative policies and programs as a result. It also “empowers people to have conversations away from government that are about government issues.”

One of the greatest challenges Larry faces in his work is meeting people’s expectations for good P2. “There is a really high bar in Austin. A desire to shape, collectively, the city rather than for it to be bequeathed to a group of elites.” Larry continued, saying this is one of the best problems a public official can have, that the community has a strong desire to be a part of the conversation and be involved in City decisions. However, there is a conflict between the desire to do P2 and the amount of resources available. There isn’t a realization of what it takes to make good P2 happen.

This is a challenge many practitioners just entering the field will face. I asked Larry what advice he would give to new practitioners in the field. “My advice would be not to take advice, and have them bring their newness to the field.” While the core values can act as your guide, new practitioners can leverage their existing passions and strengths to become more effective in the field. In Larry’s case, this calls to mind work he has done on television, a media with which he’s more comfortable with than most because of his experience in broadcast journalism.

Tool Tip: “Just because you didn’t hear about a tactic during P2 training, doesn’t mean it’s not P2.”

Larry is certain P2 has a big role to play in the future as cities across the world continue to grow and diversify. “We’re in desperate need of people who are willing to step up and advocate for the field in the country. Through strength in numbers we can each do a little to lead to a big result.” Larry is certainly playing his part as he works as a Senior Advisor on the Divided Community Project, serves as a Local Board Chair for Generation Citizen, and is a Senior Fellow at the Annette Strauss Institute for Civic Life, all of which promote active citizenship and public engagement.

Larry concluded our discussion with some thoughts about IAP2 USA: “IAP2 has been a godsend to me for about eight years. I’ve been more involved at certain periods of my career than others. I certainly hope to continue to stay involved. I am so grateful for all the organization has given me – training and mentors – and have really seen it change my life for the better.”

Categories: Member Spotlight

Announcing the Schedule for the 2017 IAP2 North American Conference

April 4, 2017 Leave a comment

THE SCENE IS SET!

ANNOUNCING THE SCHEDULE FOR THE

2017 IAP2 NORTH AMERICAN CONFERENCE!

More than 40 sessions! Three pre-Conference workshops! Something new: Pathways! The schedule is now set for the 2017 IAP2 North American Conference, September 6 – 8 in Denver, Colorado.

Read the full Schedule-at-a-Glance here.

Visit the conference page on the website.

This year’s theme, “Pursuing the Greater Good – P2 for a Changing World”, couldn’t be more timely, and once again, you have an opportunity to consider that theme from a variety of angles and share perspectives and insights.

The pre-conference workshops cover three important topics for P2 professionals: “Bringing More People to the Table”, “Digital Engagement” and “Transportation and P2”.

Pathways are “deep dives” into specific topics; three-hour discussions where you get to set the agenda, co-create and co-host. Those taking part will be able to set the physical and intellectual environment where a small group of people can tackle big questions that ultimately contribute to the field. With Pathways, you can expect an experience that is in-the-moment, dynamic, engaging … and demanding!

From now until June 30, you can take advantage of the early-bird price: US $550 for members and $700 for non-members. For that, you get:

  • workshops or field trips, Wednesday, Sept. 6
  • the welcome reception, Wednesday, Sept. 6
  • all sessions and pathways
  • continental breakfast
  • lunch and lunchtime activities
  • the Core Values Awards gala, Thursday, Sept. 7 – dinner, entertainment and a chance to applaud the best in the business

Conference Scholarships. We want to make sure as many people as possible can participate in a conference on participation, so once again this year, we’re excited to offer scholarships. Full-time students, non-profit staff members, new community advocates and active members of AmeriCorps may apply to have their conference fee covered. Download the application form here.

Are you with an organization that supports P2? Sponsoring the IAP2 North American Conference is a great way to get your corporate or organization message out to the P2 community and at the same time, demonstrate that you believe in the IAP2 principles. We have a variety of options that can fit your marketing budget, including exhibit space, program mentions and presenting sponsor for lunches and the Core Values Awards gala! Download the sponsorship package here. (Standalone Sponsorship Form)

So don’t delay – reserve today! The last two Conferences – Montréal and Portland, Oregon – sold out quickly, and with the Conference theme, the pathways and the presentations, you do not want to miss this! What’s more, our host hotel, the Westin Downtown, is offering a special Conference rate – US $189/night – for those who book by August 6.

See you in the Mile-High City!

WEBINAR REWIND: Core Values Award Winners – Respect for Diversity, Inclusion and Culture – March 14, 2017

March 23, 2017 Leave a comment

This award was presented for the first time in both Canada and the USA last year, and the winners faced decidedly different circumstances for which they had to respect diversity.

For the Saint Paul, Minnesota, Public School District (SPPS), the task was to upgrade 72 district facilities (US $2.1 billion in assets) to meet the needs of a very diverse set of students with contemporary needs and expectations.

SPPS students are:

  • 32% Asian-American
  • 30% African-American
  • 22% White
  • 14% Latino
  • 2% American Indian

Over 100 languages and dialects are spoken at home.

72% of the students live in poverty.

Some years ago, the district made a deep commitment to racial equity, and like many school systems is moving toward a student-centered, personalized approach to learning, to better prepare students for 21st century educational, employment, and community expectations.

In designing a process for the new Master Facility Plan, the Facilities Department adjusted itself in parallel with the change in the educational approach, shifting from an “expert” model to an inclusive, stakeholder-centered approach. They adopted the IAP2 Core Values, and given the technical, regulatory, and funding constraints put the process at “Involve” on the IAP2 Spectrum. At the same time, they agreed whenever possible to choose techniques that leaned toward “collaborate” on the Spectrum to demonstrate their commitment to understand and incorporate multiple perspectives and new ideas.

A strong stakeholder analysis process made clear that students, families, staff, and community partners were among the key stakeholders, and in accordance with the Core Values they must genuinely help shape of the process. A large and diverse group from across the district sat on the planning committee to frame the overall effort and serve as process stewards to ensure it was welcoming, inclusive, and respectful of all stakeholder groups and demographics.

Per the Core Values, a key priority was ensuring that participants believed and could see that their contributions made a difference. School-created internal teams thus included the usual leadership and staff and students, parents, and community members. Further, staff and consulting architects participated in a two-day racial equity training course. Those school teams and the planning committee then helped design a series of Saturday morning workshops that brought together teams from multiple schools within a K-12 pathway. Using inclusive, fun, and highly interactive techniques, participants worked together to build empathy across school communities; frame cohesive supports for students throughout their K-12 journey; and understand the different ways each site could meet needs and requirements.

By intentionally supporting participation with dates and times chosen by stakeholders, transportation, food, childcare, and interpreters, 818 stakeholders participated in 2,753 workshop hours, across 14 school pathways, and helped shape 68 building plans.

As a result of this intentionally inclusive and groundbreaking engagement work, SPPS has formalized its commitment to long-term and ongoing stakeholder engagement in facility planning – and the SPPS Board/Trustees recently approved $500 million in facility improvements over the next five years.

Watch the SPPS video here. | Check the Webinar Archive here.

 


 

The Waterfront, Alert Bay, BC

The ‘Namgis First Nation and the Village of Alert Bay share tiny Cormorant Island – off the northeast coast of Vancouver Island. The two communities have a unique mix of separate and combined cultures, histories and economies. The island was, in fact, the economic hub of northern Vancouver Island, due in large part to the commercial fishery. But in the 80s, the fishery declined, and when the world economy sank in the early part of this century, businesses closed and young people started moving away.

The two communities decided the only way to address the new reality was to increase levels of cooperation in search of a solution. EcoPlan International was called in to help produce the new Economic Development plan. The process involved deep P2 from the beginning to build trust and discover common values. As practitioners, EPI’s Colleen Hamilton and William Trousdale realized they had to learn the engagement context of two very different communities sharing the same, small space. They did so by walking the streets and talking to people – “intercept interviews” – and getting beyond the “usual suspects” in a P2 process.

As well as “meeting them where they’re at” – both physically and culturally – they enlisted local leaders to help identify people and groups that might be overlooked. They used business drop-ins and door-to-door, unstructured interviews with people and hired youth ambassadors to explain the plans to their peers. So that people could own the process, they held a “name the plan” contest, and “Tides of Change” remains synonymous with the plan that belongs to the community.

A crucial step came when a major credit union opened a branch in Alert Bay. When the last bank closed a branch several years ago, local businesses were unable to continue operating and the economic decline rapidly increased. When Vancouver City Savings (Vancity) opened its new branch, it meant that local businesses could get support and money earned on the island tended to stay on the island.

For the two communities, “Tides of Change” has meant another important step: economic reconciliation. This is an opportunity to bring equality through actions rather than simply words.

Watch the Tides of Change video here.

Categories: Webinars

Member Spotlight: Lulu Feliciano

March 23, 2017 Leave a comment

By Lauren Wirtis, IAP2 USA Intern

LuLu Feliciano

LuLu Feliciano

Lulu Feliciano is the Outreach Manager at San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA). “We oversee transit, parking, traffic, bike lanes, anything that happens on the street regarding mobility.” Lulu first learned about IAP2 three years ago when she was able to get a seat at the City Planning Department’s five-day IAP2 Foundations course. The messages and tools presented in the course (the core values, the spectrum, etc.) struck a chord. Lulu had completed the SFMTA’s Transit Effectiveness Project, during which there was a fair amount of public upset about the redistribution of transit service. “The pain we were going through was beyond transit.” It was clear the community was not feeling heard.

After the IAP2 Foundations course, it was clear that SFMTA needed to create a standardized and streamlined approach to outreach. The agency worked with a variety of stakeholders, conducted numerous focus groups and interviews (both internally and externally) to understand how the public wanted to be engaged and the best way for SFMTA to accommodate those needs. Along with Deanna Desedas, Lulu helped develop Public Outreach and Engagement Team Strategy (POETS), which would eventually mandate that projects requiring a certain number of hours be assigned a public information officer.

That was just the beginning. In 2015, the pre-construction phase for the Van Ness Improvement Project began, in which two miles of the densely developed street were going to be renovated to accommodate a new bus rapid transit service in the middle of the street. Lulu and her team were determined to “engage and inform” the community, which included residents, business owners, and the hundreds of thousands of people that traveled to and through this street on a daily basis. Lulu used IAP2 principles to help create the engagement strategy, which included:

  • The City of San Francisco’s first pre-construction survey
  • The Van Ness Business Advisory Committee
  • Interactive Text Message Campaign
  • Project Overview Walking Tours
  • Meet the Expert Speaker Series

2016 IAP2 USA Core Values Project Award for Creativity and Innovation: Van Ness Improvement Project 

“The fact that this project is now serving as a model and inspiration for further innovation and advances
in the organization’s public participation practices is further testament to the value of this project.”
—IAP2 USA 2016 Core Values Awards Panel of Judges

“Van Ness was the first project to apply IAP2 principles. Now we apply them to all projects small or large.” P2 is equally important throughout the lifecycle of a project, from planning to construction to implementation. Reflecting back on the SFMTA’s P2 journey Lulu noted:

“Sometimes it’s through challenges, mistakes, and heartaches that you really learn your lesson. Now most everybody is mindful of good P2. I realize it’s more difficult, that it requires more time and more resources, but it brings better outcomes.”

Lulu says the biggest challenge of doing this kind of work is trying to balance public versus agency needs, especially in long-term planning. Trying to plan for 20-30 years in the future can seem gratuitous compared to the issues facing the community every day. Sometimes larger goals struggle to meet on-the-ground realities. “We can eliminate parking so that other vehicles can move around, but we have to be realistic that some people need cars. There’s no magic bullet for this stuff.”

One of the most important parts of her job is working with communities of concern and “engaging with them to make sure they have a voice at the table.” Lulu regularly relies on her IAP2 Foundations training as well as what she learned in the Designing for Diversity class: “The loud voices will be heard. It’s the quiet, more silent voices you need to elevate and pull up.”

Read more about the Van Ness Improvement Project in SFMTA’s 2016 IAP2 Core Values Awards Application.

Categories: Member Spotlight

CORE VALUES AWARDS: ON YOUR MARKS … GET SET … APPLY!

March 23, 2017 Leave a comment

As a P2 practitioner you work hard to ensure that you are developing and delivering great public participation processes. Have you been a part of a P2 project that involved innovation, breaking new ground and/or engaging previously unreached sectors? The time is NOW to give others the opportunity to give you a pat on the back, and apply for the 2017 IAP2 Core Values Awards.

2016 Core Values Award Winners

There are three Project Categories:

  • General Project
  • Creativity and Innovation
  • Respect for Diversity, Inclusion and Culture

There are also three National Award Categories:

  • Project of the Year, selected from the four Project Category winners, above,
  • Organization of the Year, and
  • Research Project of the Year.

The three National Award winners will go on to compete for the IAP2 Federation Core Values Awards against winning projects from other worldwide Affiliates.

Applications are being taken now through May 10, so visit the Core Values Awards webpage and download the Applicant’s Kit. The winners will be recognized at the Core Values Awards Gala, to be held in conjunction with the 2017 IAP2 North American Conference, Sept. 6-8, in Denver, Colorado..

Need inspiration? Check out past winners by going to the Core Values Award webpage and scrolling to the bottom – learn from 2014, 2015, 2016 winners and more!